NCL Wins Rogue Wave Lawsuit

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MIAMI “ September 12, 2006 “ After a rigorous analysis of the facts and law, United States District Judge Cecilia M. Altonaga denied the plaintiffs motion for class certification in the lawsuit stemming from the April 10, 2005 voyage of Norwegian Dawn. The ship encountered heavy weather on its return to New York including an unpredictable large wave. None of the guests and crew suffered serious injuries.

œWe are pleased and gratified with Judge Altonagas decision that the lawsuit is not appropriate for class action status. From the outset, this frivolous lawsuit has existed only in the minds of the plaintiffs lawyers, said NCL Corporations President and CEO Colin Veitch.

The court victory followed the very favorable conclusions of The National Transportation Safety Board (œNTSB) and the Bahamas Maritime Authority (BMA), both finding no wrongdoing by Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) or Norwegian Dawns Captain. In its report released in November 2005, the NTSB concluded that although the rough weather made the voyage unpleasant, œthe safety and integrity of the ship was in no way compromised by this incident.

The NTSB also determined that NCL acted appropriately during the severe weather and tried to accommodate and comfort its passengers. œRather than attempting to maintain the scheduled arrival time in New York, the master decided to lower the ships speed and change its heading for the passengers comfort. Moreover, œthe hotel staff tried to accommodate the passengers needs and make them comfortable.

Similarly, the BMA found that the action of Norwegian Dawns Captain was œprudent and appropriate throughout,œ and that œthere isno evidence that any real or perceived urgency to arrive at New York earlier was a factor in the handling of the ship or that Norwegian Cruise Line did anything but support the captains on-scene decisions.

For further information, please contact NCL in the U.S. and Canada at (800) 327-7030; visit NCLs website at www.ncl.com or on AOL at keyword: NCL.